TRAUMA INFORMED PRACTICE

In the above scene, a family re-created the day of a car accident, where each person could recall where he/she was at the time of the accident. In creating the scene with modeling clay, certain details were recalled that were not included in the original trauma narrative, such as the immediate help of strangers, paramedics and police that arrived on the scene before the parents could get there. In this way, the re-telling of the narrative can now include details that could lessen the future impact of trauma from this event.

In the above scene, a family re-created the day of a car accident, where each person could recall where he/she was at the time of the accident. In creating the scene with modeling clay, certain details were recalled that were not included in the original trauma narrative, such as the immediate help of strangers, paramedics and police that arrived on the scene before the parents could get there. In this way, the re-telling of the narrative can now include details that could lessen the future impact of trauma from this event.

When trauma occurs, life changes.

Trauma comes in many shapes and sizes. Trauma occurs in the life of an individual, in the life of a family, a community, and beyond. Psychotherapy research into Trauma and Neuroscience has transformed ideas about what helps people come through to the other side of trauma. Experts agree that it is not always necessary or desirable to “re-live” all the details of a past trauma, but rather to experience change by focusing on innate strengths and core beliefs of growth and healing to change the remembered experience and lessen the effects of the trauma. Participating in an art task is less threatening than verbal explanations of a problem. Without placing blame or shaming self or others, the creation of the art product allows objectivity and clarity.   The Art Therapist acts as the guide, providing safety, care, curiosity and sensitivity to help move through the difficulties that life can present, so that the feeling of aloneness is mitigated.

Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP)

Developed by Dr. Diana Fosha, the author of the The Transforming Power of Affect, AEDP (Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy) is an ever-emergent model, ever-growing through the ongoing contributions of the AEDP faculty and the members of the AEDP community.

Crisis and suffering provide opportunities to awaken extraordinary capacities that otherwise might lie dormant, unknown and untapped. AEDP is about experientially making the most of these opportunities for both healing and transformation. Key to its therapeutic action is the undoing of aloneness and thus, the establishment of the therapeutic relationship experienced as both safe haven, and secure base. Once that’s established, we work with emotional experience, working experientially toward healing trauma and suffering, and toward expanding emergent positive transformational experiences.